1920s Vintage Film Collection

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1920’s VINTAGE FILM COLLECTION

15 Vintage Films, RARE Collections in MP4 and AVI File Formats

 

These vintage films and are excellent for entertainment, making presentations, advertisements, historical extracts, video projects and much more!

 

 

15 Vintage Silent Films Rare Collection

1920s Films

 

1. Berlin: Symphony of a Metropolis or Berlin: Symphony of a Great City (German: Berlin: Die Sinfonie der Großstadt) is a 1927 German silent film directed by Walter Ruttmann, co-written by Carl Mayer and Karl Freund. Composer Edmund Meisel was commissioned to write an orchestral score for its original release. All of the acts is the theme of the train and streetcar. Much of the motion in the film, and many of the scene transitions, are built around the motion of trains and streetcars.

2. Robin Hood (1922) is an adventure film starring Douglas Fairbanks and Wallace Beery. It was the first motion picture ever to have a Hollywood premiere, held at Grauman’s Egyptian Theatre on October 18, 1922. The movie’s full title, under which it was copyrighted, is Douglas Fairbanks in Robin Hood. It was one of the most expensive films of the 1920s, with a budget estimated at approximately one million dollars. The film was a smash hit and generally received favorable reviews

3. The Last of the Mohicans (1920) is an American film adapted from James Fenimore Cooper’s 1826 novel of the same name. Clarence Brown and Maurice Tourneur directed an adaption by Robert Dillon — a story of two English sisters meeting danger on the frontier of the American colonies, in and around the fort commanded by their father. The adventure film stars Wallace Beery, Barbara Bedford, Lillian Hall and Alan Roscoe. The film was well received at the time of its release. Film historian William K. Everson considers The Last of the Mohicans to be a masterpiece. In 1995, this film was deemed “culturally significant” by the Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.

4. Little Lord Fauntleroy (1921) is an American silent drama film directed by Alfred E. Green and Jack Pickford and starring the latter’s elder sister Mary Pickford as both Cedric Errol and Widow Errol. The film is based on the 1886 novel of the same name by Frances Hodgson Burnett.[2] A statue depicting Pickford’s role exists today on the facade of New York City’s landmarked I. Miller Building. Cedric Errol is a poor American boy who finds out that he is the sole heir to a wealthy British earldom and thus becomes Lord Fauntleroy.

5. The Mark of Zorro (1920) is a silent adventure romance film starring Douglas Fairbanks and Noah Beery Sr.. This genre-defining swashbuckler adventure was the first movie version of The Mark of Zorro. Based on the 1919 story The Curse of Capistrano by Johnston McCulley, which introduced the masked hero, Zorro, the screenplay was adapted by Fairbanks (as “Elton Thomas”) and Eugene Miller. The film was produced by Fairbanks for his own production company, Douglas Fairbanks Pictures Corporation, and was the first film released through United Artists, the company formed by Fairbanks, Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, and D. W. Griffith. Noah Beery Jr. makes his first of many dozens of screen appearance spanning six decades. He portrayed a young child; his father began sporadically billing himself as Noah Beery Sr. as a result. The film has been remade twice, once in 1940 (starring Tyrone Power) and again in 1974 (starring Frank Langella). In 2015, the United States Library of Congress selected the film for preservation in the National Film Registry, finding it “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.

6. Mud and Sand (1922) is a silent film starring Stan Laurel. The title spoofs the Rudolph Valentino film Blood and Sand, and many scenes directly parody that film: Dona Sol is replaced by Filet de Sole and Carmen is replaced by Caramel. Plot: Rhubarb (Stan) has been sent to get flour and his family are moaning about how useless he is now he has his new friend Sapo. Sapo and Rhubar laugh as they return, dragging the sack of flour on a rope. They go to the bullring and queue for a job as a matador.

7. Nanook of the North (1922) is an American silent film which combines elements of documentary and docudrama, at a time when the concept of separating films into documentary and drama did not yet exist. In the tradition of what would later be called salvage ethnography, the film follows the struggles of the Inuk man named Nanook and his family in the Canadian Arctic. It is written and directed by Robert J. Flaherty, who also served as cinematographer, editor, and producer. Some have criticized Flaherty for staging several sequences, but the film is generally viewed as standing “alone in its stark regard for the courage and ingenuity of its heroes. It was the first feature-length documentary to achieve commercial success, proving the financial viability of the genre and inspiring many films to come.

8. Outside the Law (1920) is an American crime film produced, directed and co-written by Tod Browning and starring Priscilla Dean, Lon Chaney and Wheeler Oakman.One of a series of Universal Pictures vehicles produced for Priscilla Dean, Outside the Law features Lon Chaney in dual supporting roles and his second pairing with director Tod Browning. Browning would remake the film in 1930 with a pre-Little Caesar Edward G. Robinson in Chaney’s 1920 role as a gang leader. Plot: Silent Madden, a criminal leader in San Francisco, and his gangster daughter Molly (Priscilla Dean) have forsaken a life of crime after receiving counsel from Chang Lo, a Confucianist philosopher living in Chinatown. A despicable gangster named Black Mike Sylva (Lon Chaney) frames Molly’s father for murder, causing Molly to lose faith in abiding the law and prompting her return to a life of crime. Black Mike plots to double-cross Molly as well during a jewelry theft, but Molly gets word from her gangster lover and foils Black Mike’s plans. While hiding out from the law, Molly’s hard heart is slowly melted by her gangster lover. The film ends with a climactic shootout.

9. The Phantom of the Opera (1925) is an American silent horror film adaptation of Gaston Leroux’s 1910 novel Le Fantôme de l’Opéra, directed by Rupert Julian and starring Lon Chaney in the title role of the deformed Phantom who haunts the Paris Opera House, causing murder and mayhem in an attempt to make the woman he loves a star. The film remains most famous for Chaney’s ghastly, self-devised make-up, which was kept a studio secret until the film’s premiere. The film was released on November 15, 1925. The picture also features Mary Philbin, Norman Kerry, Arthur Edmund Carewe, Gibson Gowland, John St. Polis and Snitz Edwards. The last surviving cast member was Carla Laemmle (1909–2014), niece of producer Carl Laemmle, who played a small role as a “prima ballerina” in the film when she was about 15. In 1953, the film entered the public domain in the United States because the claimants did not renew its copyright registration in the 28th year after publication.

10. The General (1926) is an American silent comedy film released by United Artists. It was inspired by the Great Locomotive Chase, a true story of an event that occurred during the American Civil War. The story was adapted from the 1889 memoir The Great Locomotive Chase by William Pittenger. The film stars Buster Keaton who co-directed it with Clyde Bruckman. At the time of its initial release, The General, an action-adventure-comedy made toward the end of the silent era, was not well received by critics and audiences, resulting in mediocre box office returns (about half a million dollars domestically, and approximately one million worldwide). Because of its then-huge budget ($750,000 supplied by Metro chief Joseph Schenck) and failure to turn a significant profit, Keaton lost his independence as a filmmaker and was forced into a restrictive deal with MGM. In 1954 the film entered the public domain in the United States because its claimant did not renew its copyright registration in the 28th year after publication. The General has since been reevaluated, and is now often ranked among the greatest American films ever made. In 1989, it was selected by the Library of Congress to be included in the first class of films for preservation in the National Film Registry for being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

11. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) is an American drama film[2] starring Lon Chaney, directed by Wallace Worsley, and produced by Carl Laemmle and Irving Thalberg. The supporting cast includes Patsy Ruth Miller, Norman Kerry, Nigel de Brulier, and Brandon Hurst. The film was Universal’s “Super Jewel” of 1923 and was their most successful silent film, grossing $3.5 million. The film is based on Victor Hugo’s 1831 novel, and is notable for the grand sets that recall 15th century Paris as well as for Chaney’s performance and make-up as the tortured hunchback Quasimodo. The film elevated Chaney, already a well-known character actor, to full star status in Hollywood, and also helped set a standard for many later horror films, including Chaney’s The Phantom of the Opera in 1925. In 1951, the film entered the public domain in the United States because the claimants did not renew its copyright registration in the 28th year after publication.

12. The Scarecrow (1920) is an American two-reel silent comedy film starring Buster Keaton. It was written and directed by Keaton and Edward F. Cline. The runtime is 19 minutes. One of the more memorable scenes of the film is the opening, where Buster and Joe Roberts share a small one room house that is filled with many space- and labor-saving Rube Goldberg-type devices. Later in the film, Keaton tries desperately and comically to outrun and escape Luke the Dog.

13. The Thief of Bagdad (1924) is an American silent swashbuckler film directed by Raoul Walsh and starring Douglas Fairbanks, and written by Achmed Abdullah and Lotta Woods. Freely adapted from One Thousand and One Nights, it tells the story of a thief who falls in love with the daughter of the Caliph of Baghdad. In 1996, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.Fairbanks considered this to be the favorite of his films, according to his son. The imaginative gymnastics suited the athletic star, whose “catlike, seemingly effortless” movements were as much dance as gymnastics.[5] Along with his earlier Robin Hood (1922), the film marked Fairbanks’s transformation from genial comedy to a career in “swashbuckling” roles. The film, strong on special effects of the period (flying carpet, magic rope and fearsome monsters) and featuring massive Arabian-style sets, also proved to be a stepping stone for Anna May Wong, who portrayed a treacherous Mongol slave. The Thief of Bagdad is now widely considered one of the great silent films and Fairbanks’s greatest work. Fairbanks biographer Jeffrey Vance writes, “An epic romantic fantasy-adventure inspired by several of the Arabian Nights tales, The Thief of Bagdad is the greatest artistic triumph of Fairbanks’s career. The superb visual design, spectacle, imaginative splendor, and visual effects, along with his bravura performance (leading a cast of literally thousands), all contribute to making this his masterpiece..

14. Tony Sarg Almanac: The Original Movie (1922) – A look at the filmmaking process in the prehistoric era, inside the Stonehenge Film Company. It seems some things haven’t changed much. The process begins with the writer dropping off his script, which the director immediately chops to bits (feeding many of them to his goat). After engaging a cast, he then proceeds to film, using a dinosaur as a camera crane. The censors then have their way with the film (more fodder for the goat). The author finally gets to see his work, but he hardly recognizes it and vents his wrath on the director.

15. Bonus: 1914 FilmThe Patchwork Girl of Oz (1914) is a silent film made by L. Frank Baum’s The Oz Film Manufacturing Company. It was based on the 1913 book The Patchwork Girl of Oz. The film was written and produced by L. Frank Baum and directed by J. Farrell MacDonald. It makes almost no use of the dialog from the book in the intertitles. While there are a number of modest special effects, the movie relies largely on dancing (or rather cavorting), slapstick, and costuming. The Patchwork Girl uses acrobatics regularly. Dr. Pipt’s daughter is added for love interest, as well as an additional plot thread: her boyfriend is turned into a small statue which women find irresistible. The plot omits the Glass Cat, the Shaggy Man, and the phonograph, but also adds Mewel, a donkey, and “The Lonesome Zoop”, both slapstick animals.

*Description source: Wikipedia and other Public Domain Sites

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